Skip to content

6 Ways E-Business SMEs Can Deliver Great Customer Service on a Tight Budget

--Advertisements --

Keeping satisfied customers is the number one priority of any retail business. Advances in technology such as interactive voice response systems, chatbots, omni-channel accessibility and robotics have helped many large e-commerce companies improve customer satisfaction.

However, these options require financial and human resources that small and medium-sized businesses often do not have, so that SMEs need to consider other options.

Here are some economic solutions that e-commerce SMEs can use.

1. Prioritize excellent customer service

Make customer service a hallmark and selling point for your business, suggested Robert C. Johnson, CEO of
TeamSupport.

"Getting the right answer and customizing your answer is more important than rushing to eliminate the queue of tickets," he told the E-Commerce Times. "It's impossible to beat big players on price, but" customers are willing to spend more with a company that offers superior customer service. "

So, when hiring customer service representatives, "try to get people who are a B + in several areas – from phone to email to chat and over – to place of employees who specialize in one thing, "said Johnson.

-- Advertisements --

2. Keep the customer informed

Communicate throughout the customer journey, advised Tara Kelly, CEO of
Splice Software.

Good technology "can make customer service more affordable," she told the E-Commerce Times.

Customize automated calls with clients' first names, account numbers and other information, and make sure the system gives the right tone to the call.

3. Stay up to date

Keep abreast of technological advances in your industry, suggested Terry Duncan, President of
Duncan Management.

See also  Use Google Analytics to Audit PPC Traffic

"If your systems begin to hinder your ability to serve well, provide or distribute in a timely manner, plan for a replacement budget," he told the E-Commerce Times.

Having a customer support software solution "is a must for small businesses," said Johnson of TeamSupport. Among other things, software "can make a customer service team look bigger than it actually is, with integrated solutions like a self-service hub."

-- Advertisements --

4. Invest in training

Technology, equipment and customer needs are constantly changing, Duncan said, and your company and your customers will both benefit if your staff stays current.

Putting emphasis on improving, stimulating and training associates helps to improve working conditions and reduce turnover, which will result in better service to the customer.

5. Understand your strengths

Do not try to confront Amazon and other big companies on their territory.

"SMEs are known to think too big when it comes to customer service to try to compete," Duncan observed.

"Do not fall into this trap, use your reactive, innovative and customizable techniques as your armor to carry," he advised.

"Customers will appreciate nice sales associates rather than the money they have spent each time," Duncan said. "And do not forget the handwritten thank you card a few days after the sale."

-- Advertisements --

6. Monitor your progress

Keep track of how your business is doing in terms of customer satisfaction.

Companies need to "measure beyond the parameters like wait times and order delivery times and focus on customer loyalty, which is to create fans who will recommend and support your product ".

See also  A short introduction to the layout of the CSS grid for e-commerce sites

For example, it is surprisingly easy and affordable to operate an automated system.
Net Promoter Score Survey, she said, focusing on the key question: "What is your probability of recommending our company?"


Richard Adhikari has been a reporter at ECT News Network since 2008. His fields of intervention are cybersecurity, mobile technologies, CRM, databases, the software development, the central and midrange computer. and the development of applications. He has written and edited for many publications, including Information Week and Computerworld . He is the author of two books on client / server technology.
Email Richard.

Advertisements

-- Advertisements --